page border

Imagine what the Ancient Greeks would think of education today

25-Jun-2019

FROM THE DIRECTOR'S DESK
It’s hard to imagine what the Ancient Greeks would think of education as it is today, with all the devices, apps and electronics involved.

Plato believed that a system of education with two subjects, music and gymnastics, was the best way to produce a citizen balanced in mind, body and soul.

Music was recognised as being so powerful that Plato believed music used in the education of the young should be regulated by law!  We don’t adhere to such strict rules today, but the benefits of learning music are as profound now as they were back then, but for different reasons.

We know that studying Music is good for the brain and brings great pleasure and enjoyment; its’ an international language that crosses many barriers. What is little known is the fact that studying music help develop long-term strategic thinking due to the amount of time, patience and planning required to gain any level of mastery.

Short term gratification is rare when studying music; practising a difficult passage requires persistence and take weeks to perfect, in the same way solving a mathematical problem requires concentration and problem-solving skills.

In a world where young people are spending more and more time online, where short-term gratification is King and fame just a few clicks away, the disciplined process of learning music helps them to understand the process and subsequent joy and satisfaction of working towards long term goals.

Our faculty has been in a flurry developing an innovative and exciting approach to delivering music education on the Coast. I am thrilled to announce the launch of MUSIC WEEK starting this week Saturday 29 June.   

Patrick Brennan
C
EO/Artistic Directo

About Us

Mission Statement

We seek to inspire our Central Coast community to engage in and value music as an integral part of life through comprehensive music education and artistic endeavour.